Alaska Food Stamp Program Benefits

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Alaska Food Stamp Program
Alaska Food Stamp Program
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The Alaska Food Stamp Program provides food benefits to low income households. The Federal government funds 100 percent of the food stamp benefit. The State pays half the costs of operating the Food Stamp Program in Alaska. The Division of Public Assistance issues food stamp benefits via the Alaska Quest card.

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What is Alaska Food Stamp Program?

The Alaska Food Stamp Program provides food benefits to low income households. The Federal government funds 100 percent of the food stamp benefit. The State pays half the costs of operating the Food Stamp Program in Alaska. The Division of Public Assistance issues food stamp benefits via the Alaska Quest card. The amount a household receives each month depends on the household’s countable income and size of the household. Eligible households use the food stamp benefits to buy food products from authorized stores statewide.

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Purpose of the Alaska Food Stamp Program?

The Alaska Food Stamp Program, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), serves as a critical assistance program to help eligible individuals and families in Alaska access nutritious food. The program, administered by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, has several key purposes:

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Alaska Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

The Alaska Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides food benefits to low-income households. The federal government funds 100% of the SNAP benefit. The State pays half the costs of operating the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Alaska. The Division of Public Assistance issues SNAP benefits via the Alaska Quest card. The amount a household receives each month depends on the household’s countable income and size of the household. 

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Eligible households use SNAP benefits to buy food products from authorized stores statewide. Eligible applicants must pass income and assets tests. The gross monthly income test is based on 130% of the current Alaska poverty standard. Alaska has special rules that allow for higher SNAP benefits in rural areas, and the use of benefits to purchase certain hunting and fishing subsistence supplies.

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Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

The Alaska Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides food benefits to low-income households. The federal government funds 100% of the SNAP benefit. The State pays half the costs of operating the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Alaska

The Division of Public Assistance issues SNAP benefits via the Alaska Quest card. The amount a household receives each month depends on the household’s countable income and size of the household. Eligible households use SNAP benefits to buy food products from authorized stores statewide.

Eligible applicants must pass income and assets tests. The gross monthly income test is based on 130% of the current Alaska poverty standard. Alaska has special rules that allow for higher SNAP benefits in rural areas, and the use of benefits to purchase certain hunting and fishing subsistence supplies.

Requirements for Eligibility

Residency. Applicants must be residents of the State of Alaska to receive Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits from Alaska.

Age and Relationship. There are no specific age limits to receive SNAP benefits. Parents and their children 21 years old or younger living together are considered one household. Minors who apply on their own must be living independently. Individuals living together and who purchase and prepare food together are treated as one household.

Citizenship and Social Security Numbers. An applicant must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. National, or a qualified alien to get SNAP benefits. Some legal immigrants are ineligible for SNAP benefits; however, dependents of an ineligible immigrant are often eligible. All household members must have a social security number or proof of having applied for one.

Work. To receive SNAP benefits, most able-bodied people between 16 and 59 years old must register for work, participate in the Employment & Training Program (E&T) if offered, accept offers of employment, and cannot quit a job. In addition, unless exempt, SNAP benefits are limited to 3 months within a 36 month period for Able Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWD’s) between the ages of 18 and 52 who are not working or participating in an approved E&T program an average of 20 hours per week.

Other Factors. Strikers must be resource and income eligible before the day of the strike. Most college students must be working half time, enrolled in work-study, caring for young dependents, or receiving Temporary Assistance. Felons convicted of drug-related offenses are not eligible for SNAP benefits unless they meet specific conditions. Individuals disqualified for fraud are ineligible for one year for the first offense, two years for the second offense, and permanently for the third. Dependents of disqualified or ineligible individuals may be eligible.

Resource Test. The asset limit is $2,750 for most households and $4250 for households containing a member who is disabled or 60 years or older.

Many types of assets are not counted such as the home you occupy and its lot, household goods, burial plots, cash value of life insurance, money in retirement savings accounts, pension plans, income producing property, 529 college savings plans, and vehicles used for an exempt reason or with an equity value under $1,500.

Countable assets include cash on hand, money in checking or savings accounts, certificates of deposit, U.S. savings bonds, stocks, bonds, property not up for sale, crowdfunding accounts, and lump-sum payments. Special rules apply to Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends.

Income Test. SNAP does not count loans, Title IV Education Act and Bureau of Indian Affairs Grants and Awards, reimbursements, Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) Corporation payments to shareholders, heating or energy assistance, and earnings of children under age 18 who are in school.

Countable income includes wages, self-employment, public assistance benefits, unemployment benefits, worker’s compensation, child support, Social Security benefits (SSA), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), pensions, and Senior Benefits payments. Special rules apply to Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends.

Deductions. SNAP rules allow income deductions, including a 20% deduction of gross earned income, a standard deduction of $338 given to households with one to five members and $349 given to households with six or more members, a deduction for dependent care costs if they are for a child who is a member of the SNAP household and are necessary to allow a household member to work or attend school,

medical expenses over $35 for elderly or disabled household members, and a shelter/utility deduction not to exceed $1073 for most households. There is no limit on shelter/utility deductions for households that contain an elderly or disabled individual.

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Alaska Food Stamp Program Benefits

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the food stamp program, is a federal assistance program in the United States that provides eligible individuals and families with funds to purchase food. In Alaska, the program is administered by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.Generally, eligibility for SNAP benefits is determined based on factors such as income, household size, and expenses. Here are some key points about the Alaska SNAP program:

  • Income Eligibility: The income eligibility criteria for SNAP in Alaska may vary based on factors like household size and expenses. Generally, households with lower incomes are more likely to qualify for benefits.
  • Benefit Calculation: The benefit amount is calculated based on factors such as income, expenses, and household size. The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services provides a benefit calculator on its website to help individuals estimate their potential SNAP benefits.
  • Application Process: To apply for SNAP benefits in Alaska, individuals can submit an application through the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services website or in person at their local office. The application process typically includes providing information about income, expenses, and household composition.
  • Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT): Once approved for SNAP benefits, recipients receive an Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card. This card can be used like a debit card to purchase eligible food items at authorized retailers.
  • Work Requirements: Some able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) may be subject to work requirements to maintain eligibility for SNAP benefits. However, there are exceptions and waivers based on factors such as age, disability, and other circumstances.

It’s crucial to check the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services website or contact their offices directly for the most up-to-date and accurate information regarding eligibility, benefits, and the application process. 

Alaska Food Stamps Program Requirements for Eligibility

Residency. Applicants must be residents of the State of Alaska to receive Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits from Alaska.

Age and Relationship. There are no specific age limits to receive SNAP benefits. Parents and their children 21 years old or younger living together are considered one household. Minors who apply on their own must be living independently. Individuals living together and who purchase and prepare food together are treated as one household.

Citizenship and Social Security Numbers. An applicant must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. National, or a qualified alien to get SNAP benefits. Some legal immigrants are ineligible for SNAP benefits; however, dependents of an ineligible immigrant are often eligible. All household members must have a social security number or proof of having applied for one.

Work. To receive SNAP benefits, most able-bodied people between 16 and 59 years old must register for work, participate in the Employment & Training Program (E&T) if offered, accept offers of employment, and cannot quit a job. In addition, unless exempt, SNAP benefits are limited to 3 months within a 36 month period for Able Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWD’s) between the ages of 18 and 52 who are not working or participating in an approved E&T program an average of 20 hours per week.

Other Factors. Strikers must be resource and income eligible before the day of the strike. Most college students must be working half time, enrolled in work-study, caring for young dependents, or receiving Temporary Assistance. Felons convicted of drug-related offenses are not eligible for SNAP benefits unless they meet specific conditions. Individuals disqualified for fraud are ineligible for one year for the first offense, two years for the second offense, and permanently for the third. Dependents of disqualified or ineligible individuals may be eligible.

Resource Test. The asset limit is $2,750 for most households and $4250 for households containing a member who is disabled or 60 years or older.

Many types of assets are not counted such as the home you occupy and its lot, household goods, burial plots, cash value of life insurance, money in retirement savings accounts, pension plans, income producing property, 529 college savings plans, and vehicles used for an exempt reason or with an equity value under $1,500.

Countable assets include cash on hand, money in checking or savings accounts, certificates of deposit, U.S. savings bonds, stocks, bonds, property not up for sale, crowdfunding accounts, and lump-sum payments. Special rules apply to Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends.

Income Test. SNAP does not count loans, Title IV Education Act and Bureau of Indian Affairs Grants and Awards, reimbursements, Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) Corporation payments to shareholders, heating or energy assistance, and earnings of children under age 18 who are in school.

Countable income includes wages, self-employment, public assistance benefits, unemployment benefits, worker’s compensation, child support, Social Security benefits (SSA), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), pensions, and Senior Benefits payments. Special rules apply to Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends.

Deductions. SNAP rules allow income deductions, including a 20% deduction of gross earned income, a standard deduction of $338 given to households with one to five members and $349 given to households with six or more members, a deduction for dependent care costs if they are for a child who is a member of the SNAP household and are necessary to allow a household member to work or attend school,

medical expenses over $35 for elderly or disabled household members, and a shelter/utility deduction not to exceed $1073 for most households. There is no limit on shelter/utility deductions for households that contain an elderly or disabled individual.

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Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed)

For SNAP-eligible residents, SNAP-Education services are available in several communities throughout the state. To learn more about this program, visit the SNAP-Ed webpage.

USDA Nondiscrimination Statement – Food and Nutrition Service

In accordance with federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex (including gender identity and sexual orientation), religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity.

Program information may be made available in languages other than English.  Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication to obtain program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language), should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.

To file a program discrimination complaint, a Complainant should complete a Form AD-3027, USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form which can be obtained online a from any USDA office, by calling (833) 620-1071, or by writing a letter addressed to USDA. The letter must contain the complainant’s name, address, telephone number, and a

written description of the alleged discriminatory action in sufficient detail to inform the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights (ASCR) about the nature and date of an alleged civil rights violation. The completed AD-3027 form or letter must be submitted to:

  1. mail:
    Food and Nutrition Service, USDA
    1320 Braddock Place, Room 334
    Alexandria, VA 22314; or
  2. fax:
    (833) 256-1665 or (202) 690-7442; or
  3. email:
    FNSCIVILRIGHTSCOMPLAINTS@usda.gov

Who is eligible for Alaska Food Stamp Program?

To be eligible for this benefit program, you must be a resident of the state of Alaska and meet one of the following requirements:

  • You have a current bank balance (savings and checking combined) under $2,001, or
  • You have a current bank balance (savings and checking combined) under $3,001 and share your household with one of the following:
  • A person or persons age 60 and over or
  • A person with a disability (a child, your spouse, a parent, or yourself).

Alaska Food Stamp Program Income Limits

In order to qualify, you must have an annual household income (before taxes) that is below the following amounts:

Household Size*Maximum Income Level (Per Year)
1$23,673
2$32,032
3$40,391
4$48,750
5$57,109
6$65,468
7$73,827
8$82,186

For households with more than eight people, add $8,359 per additional person. Always check with the appropriate managing agency to ensure the most accurate guidelines.

How do I apply for Alaska Food Stamp Program?

To apply for the Alaska Food Stamp Program, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), you can follow these steps:

  • Check Eligibility: Before applying, determine if you meet the eligibility criteria for SNAP. Eligibility is based on factors such as income, household size, and expenses. You can use online pre-screening tools or contact the Alaska SNAP office to assess your eligibility.
  • Gather Required Information: Collect the necessary information and documents needed for the application. This may include proof of identity, proof of income, rent or mortgage information, utility bills, and social security numbers for all household members.
  • Access the Application: Visit the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services website or the official SNAP website to access the online application. If you prefer a paper application, you may be able to download and print it from the website or request one from the SNAP office.
  • Create an Account (if required): Some states require applicants to create an online account. If Alaska has this requirement, follow the instructions to set up an account. Provide a valid email address and create a secure password.
  • Complete the Application: Fill out the online application form with accurate and up-to-date information. Answer all questions thoroughly, providing details about your household, income, expenses, and any other required information. If using a paper application, complete it neatly and legibly.
  • Submit Supporting Documents: Some states may require you to submit supporting documents to verify the information in your application. This could include pay stubs, tax returns, or other documentation. Check with the SNAP office to determine the specific documents needed.
  • Submit the Application: Review the completed application for accuracy. Submit the application through the online portal if applying online. If using a paper application, follow the instructions for submission, which may include mailing it or delivering it to a local SNAP office.
  • Attend an Interview (if required):In some cases, applicants may be required to participate in an interview. The interview may be conducted in person, over the phone, or through a video call. Follow the instructions provided by the SNAP office regarding the interview process.
  • Receive Notification: After submitting your application, you will receive notification from the SNAP office regarding the status of your application. This notification will inform you of approval, denial, or any additional information needed.
  • Check EBT Card Status: If approved, you will receive an Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card. This card is used to access your SNAP benefits. Check the status of your EBT card and follow any instructions provided by the SNAP office on how to use it.

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How do I apply for Alaska Food Stamp Program?

To apply for this program, download a copy of the application. Once completed, call your local Public Assistance office to set up a time for an interview. Local office locations can be found at the Public Assistance Offices page.

Alaska Food Stamp Program Phone Number

For more information, visit the Food and Nutrition Services’ SNAP Program page. Or call: 907-465-3347. 

FAQs. Alaska Food Stamp Program

Q 1. What is SNAP?

SNAP, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, is a federal assistance program designed to provide eligible low-income individuals and families with funds to purchase nutritious food.

Q 2. How do I know if I am eligible for SNAP in Alaska?

Eligibility for SNAP is determined based on factors such as income, household size, and expenses. You can use online pre-screening tools, contact the Alaska SNAP office, or visit their website to assess your eligibility.

Q 3. What expenses are considered when determining SNAP eligibility?

Eligibility is determined by considering factors such as income, housing costs, utility bills, childcare expenses, and other necessary living costs.

Q 4. How can I apply for SNAP in Alaska?

To apply for SNAP in Alaska, you can fill out an application online through the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services website. Paper applications may also be available, and you can contact the SNAP office for assistance.

Q 5. Is there an interview requirement for SNAP applicants in Alaska?

In some cases, applicants may be required to participate in an interview as part of the application process. This interview can be conducted in person, over the phone, or through a video call.

Q 6. What documents do I need to provide when applying for SNAP?

Required documents may include proof of identity, proof of income, rent or mortgage information, utility bills, and social security numbers for all household members. Check with the SNAP office for specific document requirements.

Q 7. How long does it take to process a SNAP application in Alaska?

The processing time for a SNAP application can vary. In general, eligible households should receive a decision within 30 days from the date of application. Some situations, such as expedited cases, may have quicker processing times.

Q 8. How are SNAP benefits distributed in Alaska?

Approved applicants receive their SNAP benefits on an Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card. The EBT card is used like a debit card to purchase eligible food items at authorized retailers.

Q 9. Can I use SNAP benefits to buy any food items?

SNAP benefits can be used to purchase a variety of food items, including fruits, vegetables, meat, dairy products, and more. However, they cannot be used to buy non-food items, hot foods, or prepared meals.

Q 10.Are there work requirements for SNAP recipients in Alaska?

Work requirements for SNAP recipients may vary, and exemptions exist for certain individuals. The SNAP office can provide information on work requirements and exemptions.

Q 11. Can college students receive SNAP benefits in Alaska?

College students may be eligible for SNAP benefits under certain circumstances, especially if they meet specific criteria related to income and expenses. Contact the SNAP office for guidance.

Q 12. How do I check the balance on my Alaska SNAP EBT card?

SNAP recipients can check their EBT card balance by calling the number on the back of the card or by accessing the online portal provided by the Alaska EBT system.

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