Get or replace a Certificate of Citizenship or a Certificate of Naturalization 2024

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Certificate of Citizenship
Certificate of Citizenship

U.S. citizenship:-Learn about naturalization, dual citizenship, and proving or renouncing your citizenship. Obtaining U.S. citizenship, also known as naturalization, involves meeting eligibility criteria, passing English and civics tests, attending an interview, and taking the Oath of Allegiance in a naturalization ceremony. It grants individuals full rights and responsibilities as American citizens, such as voting and obtaining a U.S. passport.

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Become a US citizen through naturalization

Naturalization is the process of voluntarily becoming a citizen of the United States. Learn about the steps that lead to US citizenship.

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  1. Eligibility: Ensure you meet requirements, including having a Green Card, being at least 18 years old, having continuous residence, good moral character, and knowledge of English and U.S. government.
  2. File N-400 Form: Submit Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization) to USCIS.
  3. Biometrics and Interview: Attend a biometrics appointment for fingerprinting and an interview to test English, civics, and background.
  4. Oath of Allegiance: If approved, take the Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony, becoming a U.S. citizen with rights and responsibilities.

proving US citizenship

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Proving U.S. citizenship can be necessary for various purposes, and you may need to do so even if you don’t have a birth certificate or were born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent. Here are some alternative ways to prove your U.S. citizenship:

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  1. Certificate of Citizenship (Form N-560 or N-561): If you were born outside the U.S. to U.S. citizen parents, you can apply for a Certificate of Citizenship from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This certificate serves as official proof of your U.S. citizenship.
  2. U.S. Passport: A U.S. passport is one of the most widely accepted documents as proof of U.S. citizenship. You can apply for a U.S. passport through the U.S. Department of State. You will need to provide supporting documentation, such as a Certificate of Citizenship or a Consular Report of Birth Abroad.
  3. Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240): If you were born abroad to U.S. citizen parents, the U.S. embassy or consulate where you were born may have issued a Consular Report of Birth Abroad. This document certifies your U.S. citizenship.
  4. Certificate of Naturalization: If you became a U.S. citizen through the naturalization process, you can use your Certificate of Naturalization as proof of your citizenship.
  5. U.S. Citizenship ID Card (Form I-197 or I-179): While not commonly issued, these ID cards can be used as proof of U.S. citizenship. They were issued in the past but have largely been replaced by the Certificate of Citizenship.
  6. Other Supporting Documentation: In some cases, you may need to provide additional supporting documents, such as your parents’ U.S. citizenship records, affidavits from witnesses who can confirm your birth or citizenship, or other relevant records.

It’s important to consult with the appropriate U.S. government agencies, such as USCIS or the U.S. Department of State, for guidance on obtaining these documents and ensuring you have the required evidence to establish your U.S. citizenship. The specific requirements and processes may vary based on individual circumstances and the document you are seeking.

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How to get dual citizenship or nationality

Having dual citizenship, also known as dual nationality, means being a citizen of the United States and another country at the same time.

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Dual citizenship means that an individual can have more than one nationality. This gives the person country-specific rights and benefits. For example, you can work, study, and reside in both countries with dual or multiple citizenships. Moreover, you get quality privileges such as education, healthcare, social security, etc.

Individuals with dual citizenship can hold multiple passports, which allow them to travel with ease. In addition, they can travel visa-free to most countries. In case you are wondering whether Indians can have dual citizenship, we have answered your query underneath

Learn about dual citizenship

Whether born an American citizen or naturalized, if you have dual citizenship, you:

  • Owe allegiance to both the U.S. and a foreign country
  • Must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the U.S.
  • Do not have to choose one nationality over the other. As a U.S. citizen, you may naturalize in another country without risking your U.S. citizenship.

Dual Nationality

Section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) states that “the term ‘national of the United States’ means (A) a citizen of the United States, or (B) a person who, though not a citizen of the United States, owes permanent allegiance to the United States.” Therefore, U.S. citizens are also U.S. nationals. Non-citizen nationality status refers only individuals who were born either in American Samoa or on Swains Island to parents who are not citizens of the United States. 

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a national of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own nationality laws based on its own policy. Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. national parents may be both a U.S. national and a national of the country of birth. Or, an individual having one nationality at birth may naturalize at a later date in another country and become a dual national.

U.S. law does not impede its citizens’ acquisition of foreign citizenship whether by birth, descent, naturalization or other form of acquisition, by imposing requirements of permission from U.S. courts or any governmental agency. If a foreign country’s law permits parents to apply for citizenship on behalf of minor children, nothing in U.S. law impedes U.S. citizen parents from doing so.

U.S. law does not require a U.S. citizen to choose between U.S. citizenship and another (foreign) nationality (or nationalities).  A U.S. citizen may naturalize in a foreign state without any risk to their U.S. citizenship. 

U.S. dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country (or countries, if they are nationals of more than one). They are required to obey the laws of both countries, and either country has the right to enforce its laws.  Claims of other countries upon U.S. dual-nationals may result in conflicting obligations under the laws of each country.  U.S. dual nationals may also face restrictions in the U.S. consular protections available to U.S. nationals abroad, particularly in the country of their other nationality.   

U.S. nationals, including U.S. dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. U.S. dual nationals may also be required by the country of their foreign nationality to use that country’s passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport to travel to or from a country other than the United States is not inconsistent with U.S. law.  

You can find additional information on dual nationality and the potential challenges for international travelers here.

Get dual citizenship

Your eligibility to become a dual citizen depends on the policies of the second country where you are applying for citizenship.

Dual citizenship if you are a citizen of another country

Some countries allow people to keep their citizenship after becoming U.S. citizens, while others do not. Contact the other country’s embassy or consulate to find out if they recognize dual U.S. citizenship. If you qualify for dual citizenship, you must first immigrate to the U.S. Then you must become a permanent U.S. resident before being eligible for U.S. citizenship. Learn more about immigrating to the U.S. And find out how to become a permanent resident.

Permanent Resident (Green) Card and immigrant visas

Learn about the Diversity Visa Lottery and other ways to apply for an immigrant visa. Find out how to get, renew, or replace a Green Card and become a permanent resident.

  • Apply for an immigrant visaLearn about family-based, fiancee, and work visas and how to apply for each. Discover the Diversity Visa Lottery.
  • How to get a Green CardLearn how to get a Permanent Resident (Green) Card, whether inside or outside the U.S.
  • How to renew or replace your Permanent Resident Card (Green Card)Learn how to renew, correct, or replace your Permanent Resident Card (Green Card). And find out how to calculate the cost.
  • Work in the U.S. with a work permit (EAD)As a nonimmigrant visa holder, you may be able to work in the U.S. temporarily with a work permit (Employment Authorization Document or EAD). Learn if you qualify and how to apply.
  • Refugees and asylumLearn how to seek refuge or asylum in the U.S. Also find U.S. embassies around the world.

Dual citizenship if you are a U.S. citizen

If you are a U.S. citizen who is seeking dual citizenship, you must find out if the other country recognizes dual citizenship with the United States.

Contact the other country’s embassy or consulate to learn if you are eligible.

Renounce or lose your citizenship

Renouncing and losing your citizenship both result in no longer being a U.S. citizen. Learn how to voluntarily renounce your citizenship or how you might involuntarily lose it.

What happens when you renounce or lose your U.S. citizenship

Renouncing or losing your citizenship both happen under very limited circumstances. Both mean that you:

  • No longer have rights and responsibilities as a U.S. citizen
  • Must become a citizen of another nation or risk becoming “stateless”
  • May need a visa to return to the U.S.

How to renounce your U.S. citizenship

Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate in the country where you intend to live to sign an oath to renounce your U.S. citizenship.

Learn more about the renunciation process.

How you may lose your U.S. citizenship

You may lose your U.S. citizenship in specific cases, including if you:

  • Run for public office in a foreign country (under certain conditions)
  • Enter military service in a foreign country (under certain conditions)
  • Apply for citizenship in a foreign country with the intention of giving up U.S. citizenship
  • Commit an act of treason against the United States
  • Are a naturalized U.S. citizen who faces denaturalization due to committing certain crimes

Prove your citizenship: born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent

Learn how to prove your U.S. citizenship if you were born without documentation outside the U.S. to a parent who was a U.S. citizen.

Typically, when a child is born outside the U.S. to parents who are U.S. citizens, they would file a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA). The U.S. Department of State issues CRBAs before a child turns 18 and are proof of the child’s U.S. citizenship. Learn more about CRBAs, including how to apply for one or get it replaced or corrected.

If your parents did not apply for a CRBA, you have two options for getting your citizenship recognized:

  1. Applying for a U.S. passport – if your parent did not register your birth at a U.S. embassy or consulate, you will need:
    • Your foreign birth record showing your parents’ names
    • Evidence of a parent’s U.S. citizenship
    • Your parents’ marriage certificate, if applicable
    • A statement from your U.S. citizen parent(s) which lists where and when they lived in the U.S. and abroad before your birth
  2. Applying for a Certificate of Citizenship – Submit Form N-600 to get a Certificate of Citizenship. This document serves as proof that you are a U.S. citizen. Learn more about Form N-600 and how to submit it.

Prove your citizenship: born in the U.S with no birth certificate

If you were born in the U.S. and have no birth certificate, learn how to get documentation to prove you are a U.S. citizen.

Contact the vital records office in your birth state so they can search for a record of your birth. If they cannot find your birth record, they will issue you a Letter of No Record, which includes:

  • Your name
  • Your date of birth
  • The years searched by the vital records office to find your birth record
  • Confirmation that they were unable to find a birth certificate on file

You may also need secondary evidence of citizenship to prove your birth in the U.S. This could include:

  • A hospital birth certificate
  • A baptism certificate
  • Census records
  • Early school records

How to get dual citizenship or nationality

Having dual citizenship, also known as dual nationality, means being a citizen of the United States and another country at the same time.

Learn about dual citizenship

Whether born an American citizen or naturalized, if you have dual citizenship, you:

  • Owe allegiance to both the U.S. and a foreign country
  • Must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the U.S.
  • Do not have to choose one nationality over the other. As a U.S. citizen, you may naturalize in another country without risking your U.S. citizenship.

Learn more about dual citizenship or nationality.

Get dual citizenship

Your eligibility to become a dual citizen depends on the policies of the second country where you are applying for citizenship.

Dual citizenship if you are a citizen of another country

Some countries allow people to keep their citizenship after becoming U.S. citizens, while others do not.

Contact the other country’s embassy or consulate to find out if they recognize dual U.S. citizenship. If you qualify for dual citizenship, you must first immigrate to the U.S. Then you must become a permanent U.S. resident before being eligible for U.S. citizenship.  Learn more about immigrating to the U.S. And find out how to become a permanent resident.

Dual citizenship if you are a U.S. citizen

If you are a U.S. citizen who is seeking dual citizenship, you must find out if the other country recognizes dual citizenship with the United States.

Renounce or lose your citizenship

Renouncing and losing your citizenship both result in no longer being a U.S. citizen. Learn how to voluntarily renounce your citizenship or how you might involuntarily lose it.

What happens when you renounce or lose your U.S. citizenship

Renouncing or losing your citizenship both happen under very limited circumstances. Both mean that you:

  • No longer have rights and responsibilities as a U.S. citizen
  • Must become a citizen of another nation or risk becoming “stateless”
  • May need a visa to return to the U.S.

How to renounce your U.S. citizenship

Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate in the country where you intend to live to sign an oath to renounce your U.S. citizenship.

Learn more about the renunciation process.

How you may lose your U.S. citizenship

You may lose your U.S. citizenship in specific cases, including if you:

  • Run for public office in a foreign country (under certain conditions)
  • Enter military service in a foreign country (under certain conditions)
  • Apply for citizenship in a foreign country with the intention of giving up U.S. citizenship
  • Commit an act of treason against the United States
  • Are a naturalized U.S. citizen who faces denaturalization due to committing certain crimes

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

DACA is a policy that delays the deportation of people who came to the U.S. as children if they do not have documentation.

DACA protection is temporary, and it is not automatic. You must file a DACA request and ask for renewal before it expires. DACA recipients may also be eligible to receive work authorization.

See the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services DACA page to learn:

  • Who is eligible
  • How to file for the first time or renew your DACA request online

Note: In 2021, a U.S. district court held that the DACA policy “is illegal.” But those who had obtained DACA on or before July 16, 2021, would still be protected. They would also be able to renew their DACA and work authorization requests.

If you did not obtain DACA by that date, you may still file for it and for work authorization. But at this time, the Department of Homeland Security will not be able to grant your initial request for DACA or work authorization.

faqs. Get or replace a Certificate of Citizenship or a Certificate of Naturalization 2024

Q 1. Eligibility and Requirements

Determine your eligibility based on your immigration status and citizenship. Ensure you have the necessary supporting documents, such as your Green Card, visa, or other immigration records.

Q 2.Complete the Appropriate Form

To replace a Certificate of Citizenship, you typically use Form N-565 (Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document).To replace a Certificate of Naturalization, you typically use Form N-565 as well.

Q 3. Gather Supporting Documents

You may need to provide evidence of your eligibility and identity, which can include copies of previous certificates, identification, and relevant immigration records.

Q 4. Pay the Filing Fee

USCIS usually requires a filing fee for processing your application. The fee may change over time, so check the USCIS website for the most current information.

Q 5. Submit Your Application

Mail your completed application, supporting documents, and the required fee to the appropriate USCIS address, as specified in the form instructions.

Q 6. Biometrics Appointment

USCIS may schedule you for a biometrics appointment to collect your fingerprints, photograph, and signature.

Q 7. Interview or Additional Documentation:

In some cases, USCIS may request an interview or additional documentation to verify your eligibility.

Q 8. Certificate Issuance

Once your application is approved, USCIS will issue a replacement Certificate of Citizenship or Certificate of Naturalization.

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